Inga Hannarr, Scumfolk 19/5/14.
Instagram : saltdoe
Facebook : Inga Hannarr

 

namesofthedead:

Tribute to aubergine, thanks Ronnie! #divinecanvas #neotrad  (at Divine Canvas Bespoke Tattooing)

namesofthedead:

Tribute to aubergine, thanks Ronnie! #divinecanvas #neotrad (at Divine Canvas Bespoke Tattooing)

asylum-art:

Magical Paths Begging To Be Walked

Roads and paths pervade our literature, poetry, artwork, linguistic expressions and music. Even photographers can’t keep their eyes (and lenses) off of a beautiful road or path, which is why we collected this list of 28 amazing photos of paths.

Paths like these have a powerful grip on the human imagination – they can bring adventure, promise and change or solitude, peace and calm. There’s nothing like a walk down a beautiful path to clear your head – or to fill it with ideas!

I’ll leave you with an excellent quote from J. R. R. Tolkien’s works while you enjoy these images; “It’s a dangerous business, Frodo, going out your door. You step onto the road, and if you don’t keep your feet, there’s no knowing where you might be swept off to.

  1. Autumn In The White Carpathians
  2. Rhododendron Laden Path, Mount Rogers, Virginia, USA
  3. Spring In Hallerbos Forest, Belgium
  4. Autumn Path In Kyoto, Japan 
  5. Autumn Path
  6. Bamboo Path In Kyoto, Japan
  7. Hitachi Seaside Park Path In Japan
  8. Dark Hedges In Ireland
  9. Winter Forest Path, Czech Republic
  10. Path Under Blooming Trees In Spring

 

lightsweep:

Britain’s Patagonia
Our first week in Glencoe was an unparalleled success, so we entered our second week on the Isle of Skye with high spirits and optimistic expectations. One of the top locations was Sligachan, (meaning “small shells” and pronounced as SLEE-ga-hhan) a small settlement around the centre of Skye. It’s known for three things: the hotel, the old bridge and the view towards Britain’s most dramatic mountain range, the Black Cuillins.
This mountain range, though not particularly tall (the tallest peak, Sgùrr Alasdair, is only 992m/3,255ft), is particularly rugged, jagged and alpine, owing to it being primarily made of tough, coarse gabbro rock. It is also Britain’s youngest mountain range. From the Sligachan river seen in this composition you see the more northern face of the Black Cuillins, presented as two “horns”: the left peak is Sgùrr nan Gillean (“Peak of the Young Men”) and the right is called Sgùrr a’Bhasteir. Navigating the river after fresh rain proved rather interesting but I eventually settled on this spot so that I could show the winding of the River Sligachan pointing towards the impressive peaks of the Black Cuillin as warm morning light cast delicious golden light across the scene.
River Sligachan, Sligachan, Isle of Skye, Hebrides, Scotland.
“Britain’s Patagonia” by Ian Hex of LightSweep is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.
If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!
Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me.

lightsweep:

Britain’s Patagonia

Our first week in Glencoe was an unparalleled success, so we entered our second week on the Isle of Skye with high spirits and optimistic expectations. One of the top locations was Sligachan, (meaning “small shells” and pronounced as SLEE-ga-hhan) a small settlement around the centre of Skye. It’s known for three things: the hotel, the old bridge and the view towards Britain’s most dramatic mountain range, the Black Cuillins.

This mountain range, though not particularly tall (the tallest peak, Sgùrr Alasdair, is only 992m/3,255ft), is particularly rugged, jagged and alpine, owing to it being primarily made of tough, coarse gabbro rock. It is also Britain’s youngest mountain range. From the Sligachan river seen in this composition you see the more northern face of the Black Cuillins, presented as two “horns”: the left peak is Sgùrr nan Gillean (“Peak of the Young Men”) and the right is called Sgùrr a’Bhasteir. Navigating the river after fresh rain proved rather interesting but I eventually settled on this spot so that I could show the winding of the River Sligachan pointing towards the impressive peaks of the Black Cuillin as warm morning light cast delicious golden light across the scene.

River Sligachan, Sligachan, Isle of Skye, Hebrides, Scotland.

Creative Commons Licence
“Britain’s Patagonia” by Ian Hex of LightSweep is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://www.lightsweep.co.uk.

If you like the way my photos look, I have a free HDR photography tutorial using free and open-source software, so it costs you nothing!

Full-res versions of the photo for personal PC/mobile wallpaper use, as well as enquiries for prints, are available by request, just ask me.

namesofthedead:

Marius: done. I still can’t quite believe that I made this. Only started doing 2colour knitting regularly 6 months ago. More photos really soon of it being worn. #mariusgenser #tradisjonstrikk #norsk #norwegian #knitfastdiewarm #winteriscoming . This was a learning experience, got to say I love the knit in round method although it’s slow as I find my finishing tends to be sloppy so yay no side seams! My one deviation from the pattern? There’s no way in hell I’m going to machine stitch and then cut armholes in something that took this long to make. Instead I divided the body at armpit level, knit front and back flat then joined them at the shoulders.

namesofthedead:

Marius: done. I still can’t quite believe that I made this. Only started doing 2colour knitting regularly 6 months ago. More photos really soon of it being worn. #mariusgenser #tradisjonstrikk #norsk #norwegian #knitfastdiewarm #winteriscoming . This was a learning experience, got to say I love the knit in round method although it’s slow as I find my finishing tends to be sloppy so yay no side seams! My one deviation from the pattern? There’s no way in hell I’m going to machine stitch and then cut armholes in something that took this long to make. Instead I divided the body at armpit level, knit front and back flat then joined them at the shoulders.